How news of Queen Elizabeth’s passing spread throughout the world.

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With the passing of Queen Elizabeth’s at the age of 96, both were in high gear Thursday. In a time when people were experiencing pain and loss over the loss of someone who had been a part of their media life for seven decades, they offered a sense of continuity and solace by working together.

On Thursday morning, CNN and MSNBC began their rolling coverage. Following the revelation of the Queen Elizabeth’s passing on Thursday afternoon, Fox News, ABC, NBC, and CBS all took a break from their regularly scheduled programmes to follow suit.

Images of the gates of Balmoral in the rain and darkening skies conveyed a sense of foreboding and passing on

Thursday morning. Split screens frequently displayed the opening pictures of the gates, the darkness, and the rain

while experts discussed the queen during the morning coverage. A timeless atmosphere of waiting at the gates for word from the castle was effectively conveyed by the photographs.

Just as striking and poignant were the photographs of a sea of black umbrellas in the rain at night outside Buckingham Place.

In spite of how difficult it is for newspapers to compete with such imagery, The New York Times offered its online

version of rolling coverage and was among the first to report that “as the queen’s death was announced on Thursday,

two rainbows were visible to crowds gathered near the Queen Victoria Memorial outside of Buckingham Palace,”

using a picture from Reuters. Social media posted a video of the rainbow and sounds of people singing “God Save the

With the passing of Queen Elizabeth’s at the age of 96, both were in high gear Thursday. In a time when people were

experiencing pain and loss over the loss of someone who had been a part of their media life for seven decades, they

offered a sense of continuity and solace by working together. as they kept watch outside Buckingham Palace during

the day.

These touching moments provide some relief from the grief of loss, and media has delivered them to our screens.

The queen, the media and changing times,

Covering Elizabeth’s life and reign has always entailed a difficult balancing act between appreciation for her sense of

civic responsibility and the deeds of some of her offspring and shifting popular perceptions of the monarchy.

Of course, it is much more important to solely convey appreciation in the wake of such a figure’s passing.

OnThursday, though, the media typically found ways to both highlight her accomplishments and

address criticism of her family. And excellent, sound, fundamental journalism was frequently used

in doing so.

A young woman outside Windsor Castle was interviewed by reporter Scott McLean to find out her

thoughts when she first learned the queen was receiving medical care.

The woman remarked, “I think it’s quite depressing. “You wouldn’t want it to occur to a member of your own family.

But I can’t say I’m a huge supporter of the monarchy or the queen in particular. As a result, I’m not

particularly outraged or overwhelmed.

So you’re not the biggest monarch lover, I wonder why,” said McLean.

The lady used “British colonial history” and Prince Andrew’s alleged sexual misbehaviour as her justifications.

The interview, which lasted for less than a minute, was quickly overshadowed by pundit praise and statements from

interviewees expressing their profound sadness over the loss of someone they not only deeply admired but who they

had come to see as an island of tradition and stability in a time of upheaval and conflict. Even though it was only one

minute amid countless others overflowing with appreciation, that voice had to be included in the coverage.

At the time of the interview, all television networks and a number of internet platforms were running a picture of

Andrew driving up to Balmoral with his brother Edward, his nephew Prince William, and Sophie, Edward’s wife.

 

The queen was criticised for how she handled the murder of Princess Diana and her protective

treatment of Andrew in online stories and on-air commentary at NPR, Daily Mail, Politico, and

MSNBC.

“Queen Elizabeth’s” Death was covered in rolling news coverage on Thursday, according to Katty Kay, a BBC Studios journalist and MSNBC
contributor. She gave her reasoning for why she believed her channel and others around the world halted what they were doing and did so.

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Kay said about anchor Nicolle Wallace, “She was the consistent, comforting presence in an ever-changing world, and that’s priceless.”
There were errors committed, Kay said, adding that she did not want to “canonise” the queen. The most significant one sticks out as Diana’s death.

However, Kay said, “she pledged herself to her people throughout the world at the age of 21, and she meant it and

kept her word. For seventy years, she successfully gained and maintained her subjects’ faith. That is an impressive

effort in a world that has evolved as quickly as ours has.

 

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